Entries from the Official Regulations
1st Brigade, Willcox's Division, 9th Army Corps, Left Wing Forces, Dept. Ohio, to April,1864.

O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXI/3 [S# 56]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, MISSISSIPPI, NORTH ALABAMA, AND NORTH GEORGIA, FROM OCTOBER 20, 1863, TO DECEMBER 31, 1863.--#23

LEFT WING FORCES IN EAST TENNESSEE.(+)

Brig. Gen. ORLANDO B. WILLCOX.

First Brigade.

Col. JOHN R. MAHAN.


115th Indiana, Lieut. Col. Alfred J. Hawn.
2d North Carolina (mounted), Capt. Andrew J. Bahney.
23d Indiana Battery, Capt. James H. Myers.

Cumberland Gap, Tenn.

O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXII/2 [S# 58]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA, AND NORTH GEORGIA, FROM JANUARY 1, 1864, TO FEBRUARY 29, 1864.--#12
DISTRICT OF THE CLINCH.

Brig. Gen. THEOPHILUS T. GARRARD.

91st Indiana, Col. John Mehringer.
117th Indiana, Col. Thomas J. Brady.
118th Indiana, Lieut. Col. Henry C. Elliott.
34th Kentucky, Lieut. Col. William Y. Dillard.
2d North Carolina (Mounted), Lieut. Col. James A. Smith.
129th Ohio, Col. Howard D. John.
16th Illinois Cavalry, Col. Christian Thielemann.
6th Indiana Cavalry (2d and 3d Battalions), Lieut. Col. Courtland C. Matson.
11th Tennessee Cavalry, Lieut. Col. Reuben A. Davis.
1st Michigan Light Artillery, Battery L, Lieut. Thomas Gallagher.
1st Michigan Light Artillery, Battery M, Lieut. Augustus H. Emery.
22d Ohio Battery, Lieut. George W. Taylor.
1st Tennessee Light Artillery, Battery B, Lieut. Isaac P. Knight.

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1st Brigade, 4th Division, 23rd Army Corps, Dept. Ohio, to February, 1865.

O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XXXIX/2 [S# 78]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA, AND NORTH GEORGIA (THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN EXCEPTED), FROM MAY 1, 1864, TO SEPTEMBER 30, 1864.(*)--#23 FOURTH DIVISION.

Brig. Gen. JACOB AMMEN.
First Brigade.
Col. WILLIAM Y. DILLARD.


34th Kentucky, Capt. Charles A. Gruber.
2d North Carolina (mounted), Capt. Samuel J. Kent.
11th Tennessee Cavalry, Maj. Edward Black.
1st Michigan Light Artillery, Battery M, Lieut. Augustus H. Emery.
1st Tennessee Light Artillery, Battery B, Lieut. Peter J. Doremas.



O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XXXIX/2 [S# 79]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA, AND NORTH GEORGIA (THE ATLANTA CAMPAIGN EXCEPTED), FROM OCTOBER 1, 1864, TO NOVEMBER 13, 1864.(*)--#23 FOURTH DIVISION.

Brig. Gen. JACOB AMMEN.
First Brigade.
Col.. WILLIAM Y. DILLARD.


34th Kentucky, Maj. Milton T. Callahan.
2d North Carolina (mounted), Lieut. Edward M. Long.
11th Tennessee Cavalry, Maj. James H. Johnson.
1st Michigan Light Artillery, Battery M, Lieut. Augustus H. Emery.
1st Tennessee Light Artillery, Battery B, Capt. William O. Beebe.


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1st Brigade, 4th Division, District of East Tennessee, Dept. of the Cumberland, to August, 1865.

O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLV/2 [S# 94]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA, AND NORTH GEORGIA, FROM DECEMBER 1, 1864, TO JANUARY 23, 1865.(*)--#18

FOURTH DIVISION.(*)

Brig. Gen. JACOB AMMEN.

First Brigade.

Lieut. Col. WILLIAM C. BARTLETT.

2d North Carolina Mounted Infantry (seven companies), Capt. Thomas L. Johnson.
11th Tennessee Cavalry (dismounted) Maj. James H. Johnson.
1st Michigan Light Artillery, Battery M.Capt. Augustus H. Emery.
1st Tennessee Light Artillery, Battery B, Lieut. William G. Bewley.

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1st Brigade, 4th Division, District of East Tennessee, Dept. of the Cumberland, to August, 1865.

Gibson's and Wyerman's, Miss., February 22, 1864

O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXII/1 [S# 57]

FEBRUARY 22, 1864.--Skirmishes at Gibson's and Wyerman's Mills, on Indian Creek, Va., and at Powell's Bridge, Tenn.
No. 1. --Report of Brig. Gen..Theophilus T. Garrard, U.S. Army, commanding District of the Clinch.
HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE CLINCH,
Cumberland Gap, Tenn., February 24, 1864.

GENERAL: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your dispatches of the 19th and 22d instant.

As I telegraphed on the 22d instant, the First Battalion, Eleventh Tennessee Cavalry, Lieutenant-Colonel Davis commanding, which was stationed at Wyerman's Mill, 5 miles east from the gap on the Jonesville road, was surprised at daylight that day, entirely surrounded, and together with an infantry company of the Second North Carolina Mounted Infantry, captured. A company of the Ninety-first Indiana Infantry, in charge of Lieutenant Wise, which was with the command of Colonel Davis, about a quarter of a mile in advance, fought and cut their way through, with a loss of 3 killed and wounded, and escaped. Four officers and about 60 men of Colonel Davis' battalion, and 7 men of the Second North Carolina company succeeded also in making their escape. Colonel Davis, among the captured, is severely wounded.

On account of never having been able to obtain a correct report from that command, it is very difficult to arrive at exact numbers so as to represent the loss of the Eleventh Tennessee Cavalry proper.

Simultaneously with the surprise of Colonel Davis' command the outpost at Powell's bridge, on Tazewell road, where I had 50 men of the Thirty-fourth Kentucky Infantry, in charge of Captain Pickering, stationed at the block-house, was attacked by the enemy (a portion of Vaughn's command) three times, but without success. To prevent their being cut off, I moved Captain Pickering, with his men, to within safe distance.

Yesterday I sent a flag of truce, in charge of Colonel Mehringer, Ninety-first Indiana Infantry, into the enemy's line for the purpose of burying our killed and with a view of obtaining some information. The flag of truce was treated with the utmost civility, but nothing could be ascertained from the fact that we did not get in communication with the commanding officer, although kept waiting a very long time for that purpose. The lines of this command are now contracted to within 2 miles of the gap.

The entire available force here consists of about 1,200 men (infantry and dismounted cavalry) and about 300 artillery (4 batteries). Three companies of infantry (Ninety-first Indiana) will go home in a day or two to be mustered out of the six months' service.

Pursuant to your instructions, I have ordered the Ninth New Hampshire to this post, although I don't anticipate an attack now. From an escaped prisoner of the enemy (citizen) I learned that the enemy had been 20 miles above here, but moved down to Ball's. Bridge, 13 miles from here, yesterday.

Very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. T. GARRARD,
Brigadier-General.

Brig. Gen. E. E. POTTER,
Chief of Staff.

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O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXII/2 [S# 58]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA, AND NORTH GEORGIA, FROM JANUARY 1, 1864, TO FEBRUARY 29, 1864.--#10
HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE CLINCH,
Cumberland Gap, Tenn., January 27, 1864.

Brig. Gen. EDWARD E. POTTER,
Chief of Staff:

GENERAL: In addition to what I reported on the 25th instant, I have the honor to state that Colonel Kise, commanding forces at Tazewell, and whom I had authorized, upon his informing me per telegraph that "after consulting with his field officers he believed he should move his forces immediately in the direction of Powell's River," to exercise his own discretion, fell back to Powell's River bridge (on the road leading from here to Tazewell) yesterday morning, believing the enemy near him in force. However, up to this morning no enemy is known to have been near Tazewell.

While I am writing this, Colonel Kise telegraphs that his scouts report the enemy's pickets within 1 miles this side of Tazewell.

At Ball's Bridge, Va., 12 miles up the valley, the Third Brigade, First Division, Cavalry Corps, is stationed.

My scouts were near Mulberry Gap three days ago; citizens represented Jones having passed there with a large force of cavalry in the direction of Jonesville, Va., though nothing has been heard of him since.

I consider it my duty to mention that articles of subsistence are decidedly scarce here at this time, the commissary department being nearly exhausted and no commissary stores having left Camp Nelson by the 25th instant for this post, although repeated applications had been made by the commissary of this post to the commissary at Camp Nelson for rations, which applications have not been replied to until after my arrival. I believe 100 head of cattle will be here in two days from Camp Nelson.

The country around here is so entirely eaten out of everything that I had to send forage train (with guard of infantry and cavalry) 22 miles from here, in the direction of Jackson, to try to get forage and meal, flour, and bacon for the troops at this post.

To recruit the deficiency of the troops and to diminish the consumption of forage, I have ordered all unserviceable and inferior horses to be turned over to the quartermaster of this post, by him to be sent to the rear, and authorized Colonel Love, commanding Third Brigade, First Division, Cavalry Corps, to dismount the Twenty-seventh Kentucky Mounted Infantry, and turn all the horses over to the Eleventh Kentucky Mounted Infantry. I have also ordered the commanding officer of the Second North Carolina Mounted Infantry to have all the horses of his regiment (probably 30 in all) turned over to Colonel Love's cavalry brigade.

In my opinion a few mounted men in a regiment only tend to demoralize the remainder, create confusion, and cause straggling, to the injury of the service and the annoyance of the citizens. When I passed through the country here, previous to my arrival here, I met an almost continuous stream of stragglers, principally belonging to Tennessee regiments.

I am, general, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. T. GARRARD,
Brigadier-General, Commanding District of the Clinch.

O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXII/3 [S# 59]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA, AND NORTH GEORGIA FROM MARCH 1, 1864, TO APRIL 30, 1864.--#3
HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF THE CLINCH,
Cumberland Gap, Tenn., March 15, 1864.

Maj. J. A. CAMPBELL,
Assistant Adjutant-General to Major-General Schofield:


MAJOR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 10th instant, which came to hand this day at 1 p.m. Inclosed please find a copy of a letter directed to Brigadier-General Potter, and forwarded this morning. I beg leave to suggest, in reference to the requirements of your communication, that with the force at my command I doubt the practicability of the directed move; in fact it is extremely doubtful whether it could be made at this time, on account of the difficulty of crossing the streams. Powell's and Clinch Rivers run parallel to each other for some considerable distance above Jonesville, and could not be crossed at this season of the year, except in boats or by wading them at shoals. I am perfectly satisfied from the statement of Lieutenant-Colonel Davis, Eleventh Tennessee Cavalry, who was wounded and captured on the 22d ultimo, but made his escape and reached here yesterday, that Jones' force is not less than 800, and that Hodge's brigade, strength not known, is near Jonesville. Colonel Davis also saw General Ransom, and reports his division not far from Jonesville. He represents, furthermore, that forage and subsistence is getting very scarce in the enemy's districts, which accounts for Jones moving up the valley. In consideration of the aforegoing information, I deem it my duty to mention the available force at my command by respectfully referring to the figures in my last tri-monthly report, which shows that the Ninety-first Indiana Infantry (seven companies) has 387 men for duty; Thirty-fourth Kentucky Infantry (ten companies) has 207 men for duty. These two regiments (594 effective men) are composed of good material. The other two regiments, the Second North Carolina Mounted Infantry (seven companies), 220 men for duty, and the Eleventh Tennessee Cavalry (ten companies), 252 men for duty (no horses), 472 men total, are without discipline, especially the latter regiment, and with their present organization are of but little value.

The large number of absentees will indicate the state of discipline in the Eleventh Tennessee Cavalry. It will perhaps not be amiss to state that Colonel Davis also informs me that the plan of those 500 cavalry of Jones' command, spoken of in my communication to General Potter and who returned the night Colonel Davis made his escape, was actually as stated in the communication mentioned.

It is very difficult for me to keep up daily communication, as there are only two mounted men in my command. In order to enable me to report daily I would respectfully request that a courier-line be established from the mounted force at your disposal, the courier-line that had been established heretofore between here and Knoxville having been discontinued by department headquarters. Another difficulty is that there are no boats this side of Clinton, a distance of 60 miles from here, which I learn from the couriers who brought your dispatches to-day.


I am, major, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

T. T. GARRARD,
Brigadier-General.

O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXII/3 [S# 59]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA, AND NORTH GEORGIA FROM MARCH 1, 1864, TO APRIL 30, 1864.--#13
SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 101.
HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,
Knoxville, Tenn., April 10, 1864.

I. The Twenty-third Army Corps will be reorganized as follows, to take effect on the 11th instant:

  • First Division, Twenty-third Army Corps, Brig. Gen. A. P. Hovey commanding:
    • First Brigade, Col. R. F. Barter commanding:
      • One hundred and twentieth Indiana Volunteer Infantry
      • One hundred and twenty-fourth Indiana Volunteer Infantry
      • One hundred and twenty-eighth Indiana Volunteer Infantry
    • Second Brigade, Col. J. C. McQuiston commanding:
      • One hundred and twenty-third Indiana Volunteer Infantry
      • One hundred and twenty-ninth Indiana Volunteer Infantry
      • One hundred and thirtieth Indiana Volunteer Infantry
    • Artillery attached to First Division:
      • Twenty-third Indiana Battery, Capt. James H. Myers
      • Twenty-fourth Indiana Battery, Lieut. Henry W. Shafer commanding
  • Second Division, Twenty-third Army Corps, Brig. Gen. H. M. Judah commanding:
    • First Brigade, Brig. Gen. M. S. Hascall commanding:
      • Twenty-fifth Michigan Volunteer Infantry
      • Eightieth Indiana Volunteer Infantry
      • Thirteenth Kentucky Volunteer Infantry
      • Third East Tennessee Volunteer Infantry
      • Sixth East Tennessee Volunteer Infantry
    • Second Brigade, Col. M. W. Chapin, Twenty-third Michigan, commanding:
      • Twenty-third Michigan Volunteer Infantry
      • One hundred and eighteenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry
      • One hundred and eleventh Ohio Volunteer Infantry
      • Forty-fifth Ohio Volunteer Infantry
      • One hundred and seventh Illinois Volunteer Infantry
    • Artillery attached to Second Division:
      • Battery F, First Michigan, Captain Paddock
      • Nineteenth Ohio Battery, Capt. J. C. Shields commanding
  • Third Division, Twenty-third Army Corps, Brig. Gen. J. D. Cox commanding:
    • First Brigade, Brig. Gen. M.D. Manson commanding:
      • One hundredth Ohio Volunteer Infantry
      • Sixty-third Indiana Volunteer Infantry
      • One hundred and fourth Ohio Volunteer Infantry
      • Sixteenth Kentucky Volunteer Infantry
      • Eighth Tennessee Volunteer Infantry
    • Second Brigade
      • Twenty-fourth Kentucky Volunteer Infantry
      • One hundred and twelfth Illinois Volunteer Infantry
      • One hundred and third Ohio Volunteer Infantry
      • Sixty-fifth Indiana Volunteer Infantry
      • Fifth Tennessee Volunteer Infantry
      • Sixty-fifth Illinois Volunteer Infantry
    • Artillery attached to Third Division:
      • Fifteenth Indiana Battery, Lieut. A.. D. Harvey
      • Battery D, First Ohio Artillery, Captain Cockerill
  • Fourth Division, Twenty-third Army Corps, Brig. Gen. Jacob Ammen commanding
    • First Brigade, Brig. Gen. T. T. Garrard commanding:
      • Ninety-first Indiana Volunteer Infantry
      • Thirty-fourth Kentucky Volunteer Infantry
      • Second North Carolina Mounted Infantry
      • Eleventh Tennessee Volunteer Cavalry
      • Battery L, First Michigan Artillery
      • Battery F, First Tennessee Artillery
      • Battery M, First Michigan Artillery
      • Twenty-second Ohio Battery
    • Second Brigade (Reserve Artillery), Brig. Gen. Davis Tillson commanding:
      • Second Tennessee Volunteer Infantry
      • First Ohio Heavy Artillery
      • First U.S. Colored Heavy Artillery
      • Battery A, First Ohio Artillery
      • section Wilder Battery
      • Twenty-first Ohio Battery
      • Tenth Michigan Volunteer Cavalry
  • Fifth Division, Twenty-third Army Corps, Brig. Gen. S. G. Burbridge commanding:
    • First Brigade, Brig. Gen. T. T. Garrard commanding:
      • All troops belonging to the District of Kentucky. They will be organized by their commander into sub-divisions or brigades, and brigade commanders assigned as directed in instructions from these headquarters dated March 15, 1864.

II. The District of East Tennessee will consist of that portion of East Tennessee occupied by the Fourth Division, Twenty-third Army Corps, including the present District of the Clinch.

III. Maj. H. W. Wells, First Tennessee Artillery, is relieved from duty as chief of artillery of the Twenty-third Army Corps, and will report to Brig. Gen. Davis Tillson for duty as inspector of his brigade.

IV. District commanders will make their reports and returns to department headquarters at Knoxville, Tenn. Division commanders in the field will report to corps headquarters in the field. Where brigade commanders are not assigned in this order the senior officers present for duty will be assigned by the division commanders.


By command of Major-General Schofield:

R. MORROW,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

O.R.-- SERIES I--VOLUME XXXII/3 [S# 59]
UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, SOUTHWEST VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA, AND NORTH GEORGIA FROM MARCH 1, 1864, TO APRIL 30, 1864.--#14
SPECIAL ORDERS, No. 103.
HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,
Knoxville, Tenn., April 12, 1864.

VII. The One hundred and twelfth Illinois Infantry is hereby transferred from the First to the Second Brigade, Third Division, Twenty-third Army Corps, and the Sixty-third Indiana Infantry is transferred from the Second to the First Brigade, Third Division, Twenty-third Army Corps.

IX. The Fiftieth Ohio Infantry and Fourth Tennessee Infantry will move, without unnecessary delay, to Loudon, Tenn., and take post at that place under the direction of Brigadier-General Ammen, commanding Fourth Division, Twenty-third Army Corps. On the arrival of the Fiftieth Ohio at Loudon, the troops of the Fourth Army Corps now at that place and between that place and Knoxville will be relieved from further duty in this department. They will march to Charleston, on the Hiwassee, and report for further orders to Major-General Thomas, commanding Army of the Cumberland. The troops now stationed on the railroad between Loudon and Charleston will remain in their present positions until further orders.

XI. The Fourth Division, Twenty-third Army Corps, Brigadier-General Ammen commanding, will be distributed as follows, viz:

  • 1. The First Brigade, Brigadier-General Garrard commanding, will occupy Cumberland Gap, and keep open its line of communication with its depot of supplies in Kentucky. The Eleventh Tennessee Cavalry and Second North Carolina Mounted Infantry (now dismounted) will be remounted as soon as the horses can be obtained and forage becomes sufficient for their support. They will then protect the communication with Knoxville, and scout as far as practicable in front of Cumberland Gap, keeping inferior forces of the enemy at a distance and gaining early and accurate information of the movements of any superior force. Cumberland Gap must be held obstinately, and raids into Kentucky or Middle Tennessee prevented as far as possible with the troops of the First Brigade.
  • 2. The Second Brigade (Reserve Artillery), Brigadier-General Till-son commanding, will occupy the defenses of Knoxville, and, if practicable, protect the railroad bridge at Strawberry Plains and the railroad to Loudon. The regiment of cavalry attached will be employed under the direction of the brigade or division commander in scouting the surrounding country for the purpose of gaining early and accurate information of any movement of the enemy. Special care must be taken to keep the horses in serviceable condition. Knoxville must be held at all hazards and against any force, however large. Its defenses will be completed under the immediate direction and superintendence of Brigadier-General Tillson, and will be made as formidable as practicable. Store-houses for the arms and commissary of subsistence depots will be erected at suitable places within the defenses, large enough to contain four months' supplies for the garrison. Brigadier-General Tillson is assigned to the immediate command of the Reserve Artillery and of the defenses of Knoxville, with his headquarters at Knoxville. He will equip and keep prepared for the field such reserve light artillery as may from time to time be ordered, and will re-equip and refit such batteries as may be sent to the rear for that purpose. He is also charged with the care of the reserve supplies of artillery and ordnance stores, and will attend to the filling of all requisitions for such supplies for troops in the field. Brigadier-General Tillson will continue the organization of colored troops in the District of East Tennessee and the care of the contrabands at Knoxville, in accordance with orders which he has heretofore received. The Second Tennessee Infantry will furnish such details as may be required by the provost-marshal-general of East Tennessee for the execution of his orders.
  • 3. The Third Brigade, Colonel Strickland commanding, will be distributed under the direction of the division commander in such manner as to hold the railroad bridge at Loudon, protect the railroad between that point and the Hiwassee as far as practicable, and hold the railroad bridge and supply depot at the Hiwassee as long as may be necessary. The regiment now at Kingston may be left at that place and vicinity for protection of quartermaster's property and for such other duty as may be required.

Brigadier-General Ammen, commanding Fourth Division, will give his special attention to the drill, discipline, and efficiency of the Third Brigade, and to the erection of defenses at Loudon and the Hiwassee, and spend at those points as much of his time as can be spared from other duties. He will make his headquarters at any point in his district where his presence may at any time be most needed.

The disposition herein ordered for the Fourth Division is subject to such modifications as circumstances may, in the opinion of the general commanding the division, require from time to time, having in view the importance of holding the four points--Knoxville, Cumberland Gap, Loudon, and Hiwassee.

O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLIX/1 [S# 103]
JANUARY 23-27, 1865.--Scout from Cumberland Gap. Tenn.
Reports of Lieut. Col. William C. Bartlett, Second North Carolina Mounted Infantry.
CUMBERLAND GAP, January 28, 1865.

GENERAL: On Monday last I sent out a scout under Lieut. J. N. Jennings, of Second North Carolina Mounted Infantry, which returned yesterday, having killed 12 rebel guerrillas, wounded a number, and captured 10, besides having captured from the rebels 40 horses, some of them saddled.


W. C. BARTLETT,
Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding.

Brigadier-General TILLSON,
Commanding Fourth Division, Twenty-third Army Corps.


CUMBERLAND GAP, January 28, 1865.

The men sent on scout were those of Lieutenant Jennings' command, North Carolina Mounted Infantry, and of Captains Odle's and Riley's home guards. I would like to dispose of captured stock, so as to keep all these squads well mounted, as they all are constantly hard at work, acting under my orders. Cannot also rations be issued to them? The proportion of killed was larger than reported, being between 20 and 25 instead of 12. My orders are to shoot a guerrilla whenever and where ever [he] is found, and not to take prisoners on any account.


W. C. BARTLETT,
Lieutenant-Colonel.

O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLIX/1 [S# 103]
MARCH 3-5, 1865.--Reconnaissance from Cumberland Gap, Tenn., toward Jonesville, Va., with skirmishes (4th)at Ball's Bridge, Va., and (5th)at Tazewell, Tenn.
Reports of Lieut. Col. William C. Bartlett, Second North Carolina Mounted Infantry.


CUMBERLAND GAP, March 5, 1865.


On the 3d I made a reconnaissance toward Jonesville. Was attacked yesterday morning at Ball's Bridge by about 250 rebels. We whipped them and drove them back up the valley. Owing to high waters I did not follow them over a couple of miles. I had 103 men with me. Has courier arrived with letter of mine to A. G. If so please retain letter till you hear from me. Please answer.

W. C. BARTLETT,
Lieutenant-Colonel.

Captain DEANE, Assistant Adjutant-General.

CUMBERLAND GAP, March 5, 1865.

Part of Giltner's command surrounded Tazewell this a.m. and made a formal demand for surrender. This was refused, and they attacked Jennings with vigor. The enemy was thoroughly beaten, numbers killed and wounded, and Lieutenant Richmond captured. Have as yet no further details. Rebels asked time to bury their dead, but Lieutenant Jennings charged them instead. The attacking force was commanded by Lieutenant-Colonel Prentice, Seventh Confederate Cavalry Battalion.

W. C. BARTLETT,
Lieutenant-Colonel.

Brigadier-General TILLSON.

ADDENDA.
HEADQUARTERS DISTRICT OF EAST TENNESSEE AND FOURTH DIVISION, TWENTY-THIRD ARMY CORPS,
Knoxville, Tenn., March 5, 1865.

Lieut. Col. W. C. BARTLETT,
Commanding, Cumberland Gap:


Your dispatch received. I congratulate you upon your success. How much force did the enemy have? Is there any reason to suppose that they were the advance of any considerable force, or that it means anything more than a raid?


DAVIS TILLSON,
Brig. Gen., U. S. Volunteers, Comdg. District and Division.

O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLIX/1 [S# 103]
MARCH 21-APRIL 25, 1865.--Expedition from E. Tn. into SW Va. and W. NC No. 5.--Reports of Brig. Gen. Davis Tillson, U.S. Army, commanding Fourth Division, Department of the Cumberland, of operations March 22-May 17.
HDQRS. FOURTH DIVISION, DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND,
Greeneville, Tenn., May 18, 1865.


On the 22d of March the First Brigade was concentrated at Morristown, except the Second and Third North Carolina Regiments.

On the 23d the troops moved toward Bull's Gap, reaching this point the same day. Thence the brigade moved to Brabson's Mills, arriving at that place on the 26th instant.

On the 29th the troops moved to mouth of Roan Creek. Here disposition was made to hold the mountain passes; the Second and Third North Carolina Mounted Infantry were sent to Boone, N. C., and the Fourth Tennessee Infantry and one battalion of the First U. S. Colored Heavy Artillery to Taylorsville and vicinity, and a thorough reconnaissance of the mountain passes made by the general commanding in person. Rough but strong earth-works were erected at each of the above-named places and other points. The enemy at this point made a slight demonstration, capturing a squad of cavalry, attached. In compliance with instructions previously received the command was moved toward Greeneville, reaching that place about the 20th of April, except the Fourth Tennessee Infantry, which was retained at Jonesborough.

On the 27th the Second and Third North Carolina Mounted Infantry, First U.S. Colored Heavy Artillery, and First Ohio Volunteer Heavy Artillery were moved toward Asheville, N. C. (all but the latter regiment, which was ordered back to Greeneville), arriving there on the 30th. The Third North Carolina was sent via Waynesville and Franklin to Rabun Gap, the Second North Carolina to Waynesville on the 4th of May. Colonel Bradford surrendered to General Tillson with his command on the 6th.

On the 6th of May instructions were sent to Colonel Hawley to move the First U.S. Colored Heavy Artillery to Greeneville at once, and to send instructions to the Second and Third North Carolina to move to Asheville at once; to have the Second North Carolina remain at Asheville until the Third North Carolina arrived at that place, when the Second would at once move to. Greeneville, leaving Colonel Kirk to remain a few days at Asheville to collect the stragglers of his own and other commands, and then return to Greeneville.

On the 3d of May General Martin, commanding Confederate forces in Western North Carolina, surrendered with his command to Lieutenant-Colonel Bartlett, commanding Second North Carolina Mounted Infantry. The terms granted were those given by General Grant to General Lee. But for some reason Colonel Bartlett allowed a portion of the men surrendered to retain their arms. He was at once directed to revoke that portion of the agreement allowing the retention of arms in pursuance of this agreement.

On the 17th the Third North Carolina arrived at Asheville, and the Second North Carolina Mounted Infantry moved toward Greeneville. The command is now all at Greeneville, except the Fourth Tennessee Infantry, at Jonesborough; one battalion of the First Ohio Volunteer Heavy Artillery, guarding railroad from Greeneville to Morristown, and the Third North Carolina Mounted Infantry, at Asheville. During all the operations of the troops of the Fourth Division in the field [there were no] casualties except the capture of the party of the cavalry, attached. There were 4,500 men in the command when it moved. This number has been considerably augmented by recruits enlisted in the North Carolina and colored regiments.

Respectfully, your obedient servant,

DAVIS TILLSON,
Brigadier-General of Volunteers.

By W. W. DEANE,
Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

(In the absence of the general.)
Maj. O. M. BASCOM,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLIX/2 [S# 104]
Union Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Kentucky, Southwestern Virginia, Tennessee, Northern And Central Georgia, Mississippi, Alabama, And West Florida, From March 16 To June 30, 1865.--#1
SPECIAL ORDERS No. 60.
HDQRS. DISTRICT OF EAST TENNESSEE
Knoxville, Tenn., March 17, 1865

.

III. In accordance with instructions from headquarters Department of the Cumberland, the cavalry forces now serving in this District of East Tennessee will constitute a division to be denominated, until further orders, Cavalry Division, District of East Tennessee, and commanded by Brig. Gen. A. C. Gillem. The First Brigade, Col. William J. Palmer's, will consist of the Fifteenth Pennsylvania, the Twelfth Ohio, and Tenth Michigan Cavalry Regiments. The Second Brigade, Colonel and Brevet Brigadier-General Brown's, will consist of the Eleventh Michigan and Eleventh and Twelfth Kentucky Cavalry Regiments. The Third Brigade, Col. J. K. Miller's, will consist of the Eighth, Ninth, and Thirteenth Regiments Tennessee Cavalry.

IV. In accordance with instructions from headquarters Department of the Cumberland, the infantry and artillery now serving in this district will constitute a division to be denominated Fourth Division, Department of the Cumberland, to consist of two brigades and to be commanded by Brig. Gen. Davis Tillson. The First Brigade, Col. C. G. Hawley's, will consist of First Regiment Ohio Volunteer Heavy Artillery, First U.S. Colored Heavy Artillery, Second North Carolina Mounted Infantry, Third North Carolina Mounted Infantry, Fourth Tennessee Volunteer Infantry, Thomas' battery Indiana Light Artillery, detachment engineer battalion, and band Second Brigade, Fourth Division, Twenty-third Army Corps. The Second Brigade, Col. H. G. Gibson's, will consist of Second Ohio Volunteer Heavy Artillery, Thirty-fourth Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, First Tennessee Volunteer Infantry, Second Tennessee Volunteer Infantry, Twenty.first Battery Ohio Light Artillery, Twenty-second Battery Ohio Light Artillery, Eleventh Battery Michigan Light Artillery, Henshaw's battery Illinois Light Artillery, Colvin's battery Illinois Light Artillery, Battery B, First Tennessee Light Artillery, Battery M, First Michigan Light Artillery, and Seventh Tennessee Mounted Infantry.

V. Division and brigade commanders will forthwith complete and organize their staffs in accordance with existing orders.

VI. Captain Patterson's battery Tennessee Light Artillery is not included in the infantry division, but will constitute a part of the cavalry division.

VII. The First and Second Regiments Tennessee Volunteer Infantry will proceed at once to Cumberland Gap and relieve the Second Regiment North Carolina Mounted Infantry, now at that place. The Second Regiment North Carolina Mounted Infantry upon being relieved will move at once to Strawberry Plains, Tenn., and report to Brig. Gen. Davis Tillson for further orders.

By command of Major-General Stoneman:

G. M. BASCOM,
Major and Assistant Adjutant-General.

1865 - January
JANUARY 23-27, 1865.--Scout from Cumberland Gap. Tenn.
Reports of Lieut. Col. William C. Bartlett, Second North Carolina Mounted Infantry.

CUMBERLAND GAP, January 28, 1865.

GENERAL: On Monday last I sent out a scout under Lieut. J. N. Jennings, of Second North Carolina Mounted Infantry, which returned yesterday, having killed 12 rebel guerrillas, wounded a number, and captured 10, besides having captured from the rebels 40 horses, some of them saddled.

W. C. BARTLETT,
Lieutenant-Colonel, Commanding.

Brigadier-General TILLSON,
Commanding Fourth Division, Twenty-third Army Corps.

CUMBERLAND GAP, January 28, 1865.

The men sent on scout were those of Lieutenant Jennings' command, North Carolina Mounted Infantry, and of Captains Odle's and Riley's home guards. I would like to dispose of captured stock, so as to keep all these squads well mounted, as they all are constantly hard at work, acting under my orders. Cannot also rations be issued to them? The proportion of killed was larger than reported, being between 20 and 25 instead of 12. My orders are to shoot a guerrilla whenever and where ever [he] is found, and not to take prisoners on any account.

W. C. BARTLETT,
Lieutenant-Colonel.

Brigadier-General TILLSON.

O.R.--SERIES III--VOLUME IV [S# 125]
CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, REPORTS, AND RETURNS OF THE UNION AUTHORITIES FROM JANUARY 1, 1864, TO APRIL 30, 1865.--#42
NEIL HOUSE, Columbus, Ohio, January 5, 1865.
Brig. Gen. H. W. WESSELLS,
Washington City, D.C.:

GENERAL: I was ordered here to recruit for the Second Regiment North Carolina Mounted Infantry from the prisoners captured at Cumberland Gap, Tenn., in September, 1863, by Major-General Burnside, consisting of the Twenty-ninth, Sixty-second, and Sixty-fourth North Carolina Infantry, C. S. Army. The larger number of those men were and now are Union men and have written from time to time to me to come and get them out of prison. I am here with six of my men who are acquainted with nearly all of the Union men of those three regiments who were conscripted in the rebel army. Some are here, others at Camp Douglas, and some at Johnson's Island. I would most respectfully ask permission to enter the three camps and recruit all the men who are willing to enlist and that I can prove are true, loyal men now and before the war. I saw General Thomas at Lexington and the general said he would telegraph to the Secretary of War and that I would be notified at Camp Chase. I shall anxiously wait an answer.


I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, A. J. BAHNEY,
Major Second Regiment North Carolina Mounted Infantry.


[First indorsement.]
OFFICE COMMISSARY-GENERAL OF PRISONERS,
Washington, D.C., January 10, 1865.
Respectfully submitted to the Secretary of War for instructions.

H. W. WESSELLS,
Brig. Gen., U. S. Vols., Insp. and Com. Gen. of Prisoners.

[Second indorsement.]
WAR DEPARTMENT,
January 13, 1865.

Respectfully referred to the commissioner for the exchange of prisoners.

By order of the Secretary of War:
LOUIS H. PELOUZE,
Assistant Adjutant-General.

[Third indorsement.]
JANUARY 14, 1865.

It is not believed to be expedient to adopt the policy here urged. Approved by the Secretary of War:

E. A. HITCHCOCK,
Major-General of Volunteers.

O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME LII/1 [S# 109]
Union Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Southwestern Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, West Florida, And Northern Georgia, From January 1, 1861, To June 30, 1865.--#16
SPECIAL ORDERS No. 44.
HDQRS. DEPARTMENT OF THE OHIO,
February 13, 1864.

3. The Third and Sixth Regiments of Tennessee Volunteer Infantry are hereby temporarily assigned to the Second Division, Twenty-third Army Corps, Brig. Gen. H. M. Judah commanding, to whom the commanding officers of those regiments will at once report in person for instructions.

6. Authority is hereby granted to Maj. G. W. Kirk, of the Second North Carolina Mounted Infantry, to raise a regiment of troops in the eastern front of Tennessee and western part of North Carolina. The regiment will be organized as infantry, and will be mustered into the service of the United States to serve for three years, unless sooner discharged. The regiment will rendezvous as soon as practicable at headquarters Department of the Ohio, or other place to be hereinafter designated, to be mustered into service. The commanding officer is authorized to mount his regiment, or such portion of it as may from time to time be necessary, upon private or captured horses. This regiment will be known as the Third Regiment of North Carolina Mounted Infantry.

By command of Major-General Schofield:
HENRY CURTIS, JR.,
[32.] Assistant Adjutant-General.

1865 - March O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLIX/2 [S# 104]
Union Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Kentucky, Southwestern Virginia, Tennessee, Northern And Central Georgia, Mississippi, Alabama, And West Florida, From March 16 To June 30, 1865.--#31
HEADQUARTERS U.S. FORCES,
Asheville, N. C., May 13, 1865.


Capt. W. W. DEANE,
Assistant Adjutant-General:

CAPTAIN: I am this moment in receipt of your communication of the 12th instant stating that Colonel Hawley reports that in the surrender of the troops of General Martin's command Colonel Thomas was allowed upon some pretext to exempt one battalion from said surrender. Colonel Hawley is mistaken in the facts of the case. General Martin's command consisted of Thomas' Legion only, which comprised one regiment and two battalions, one of which battalions was an Indian one. These were surrendered to me and have been paroled. The arms are now being collected. General Martin and Colonel Thomas both informed me that this battalion of Indians was the only one which was or had been in the employ of the so-called Confederate States Government for more than a year. There were Indians and still are in the country between Waynesville and Knoxville who, having arms of their own, have been using them against robbers who infest in bands that mountain country, but who have not fired on Federal soldiers. These were the parties referred to in my conversation with Colonel Hawley and against whom I did not deem it my duty to do anything. Colonel Thomas assured me that these men would not use their arms against any troops belonging to the United States Government, and that the arms in their possession were not the property of the Confederate Government. Instead of their being in number equal to a battalion I do not think they number 100. These men are also scattered through the whole mountain country of Western North Carolina and are at their homes attending to their farms. I endeavored to make the surrender of General Martin's command comprise his whole command, and beg to refer you to General Martin's letter for explanation of terms, &c. I know of no organization in this country at present, except Teague's scouts, Keith's detail, Lewis' scouts, and a band under a man named Lane, against all of whom my men are now actively engaged. I have details of from twenty-five to forty men each in different parts of the country in pursuit of these outlaws at the present moment. At the time of General Martin's surrender Colonel Thomas had with him what he styled his Life Guard, about twenty men, Indians, whom he said were constantly with him as protection to his person against robbers. They were not, however, in the employ of the Confederate Government.


I am, captain, very respectfully, your obedient servant,

W. C. BARTLETT,
Lieut. Col. Second North Carolina Mounted Infantry, Comdg. Post.

P. S.--General Martin's agreement with me was to turn over all Confederate States Government arms in his entire department.

O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLIX/2 [S# 104]
Union Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Kentucky, Southwestern Virginia, Tennessee, Northern And Central Georgia, Mississippi, Alabama, And West Florida, From March 16 To June 30, 1865.--#28
HDQRS. FOURTH DIVISION, DEPT. OF THE CUMBERLAND,
Greeneville, Tenn., May 9, 1865.

Col. C. G. HAWLEY,
Comdg. 1st Brig., 4th Div., Dept. of the Cumberland, Asheville, N. C.:

Upon receipt of this you will send word to Colonel Kirk to come back to Asheville with his regiment, by way of Franklin, Webster, and Waynesville. Direct him to summon all armed bands to surrender, as previously directed in telegraph from Major-General Stoneman, and to pursue, kill, or capture all who do not surrender. Order Second North Carolina Mounted Infantry to Asheville immediately, and have Lieutenant-Colonel Bartlett make his headquarters there until Colonel Kirk arrives, when he will move here with his regiment, unless the subsistence stores become exhausted, in which case he will move to this place without waiting for Kirk. I would like to have Colonel Kirk remain in Asheville a few days, if there are stores for his regiment, and gather up his command and all stragglers, and then return to this place, with all troops, transportation, and stores remaining in Asheville. You will order the First U.S. Colored Artillery (Heavy), with transportation, supplies, and ammunition, to this place, leaving ten teams of Quartermaster Brown's train, in addition to the regimental train of Second North Carolina Mounted Infantry and Third North Carolina Mounted Infantry, and guard sufficient to protect those and the subsistence stores, which will be left behind for use of Second and Third North Carolina Mounted Infantry. You will come yourself with detachment of Tenth Michigan Cavalry, leaving the other cavalry to report to Lieutenant-Colonel Bartlett on his arrival, and report to these headquarters as soon as practicable.

By command of Brig. Gen. D. Tillson:
W. W. DEANE,
Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

P. S.--In addition to the ten wagons left from Lieutenant Brown's train you will leave four wagon loads of ammunition for Second and Third North Carolina Mounted Infantry.

By command of Brigadier-General Tillson:
W. W. DEANE,
Captain and Assistant Adjutant-General.

O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLIX/2 [S# 104]
Union Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Kentucky, Southwestern Virginia, Tennessee, Northern And Central Georgia, Mississippi, Alabama, And West Florida, From March 16 To June 30, 1865.--#9
SPECIAL FIELD ORDERS No. 7.
HEADQUARTERS FOURTH DIVISION,
DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND,

In Field, Mouth of Roan Creek, Tenn., April 3, 1865.

I. Col. G. W. Kirk, Third North Carolina Mounted Infantry, will proceed with his regiment and the Second North Carolina Mounted Infantry to Boone, N. C., and upon his arrival there will immediately proceed to carry out the instructions given him by the general commanding.

III. Maj. A. J. Bahney, commanding Second North Carolina Mounted Infantry, will report immediately to Col. G. W. Kirk, Third North Carolina Mounted Infantry, in command of forces en route to Boone, N. C.

By command of Brigadier-General Tillson:
E. W. S. NEFF,
Lieutenant and Acting Assistant Adjutant-General.

UNION CORRESPONDENCE, ORDERS, AND RETURNS RELATING TO OPERATIONS IN KENTUCKY, SOUTHWESTERN VIRGINIA, TENNESSEE, NORTHERN AND CENTRAL GEORGIA, MISSISSIPPI, ALABAMA, AND WEST FLORIDA, FROM JANUARY 1 TO MARCH 15, 1865.--#9
DISTRICT OF EAST TENNESSEE.
Brig. Gen. DAVIS TILLSON.
FOURTH DIVISION, TWENTY-THIRD ARMY CORPS.

Brig. Gen. DAVIS TILLSON.
First Brigade.
Lieut. Col. WILLIAM C. BARTLETT.
34th Kentucky, Maj. Joseph B. Watkins.
2d North Carolina Mounted Infantry, Capt. Andrew J. Bahney.
1st Michigan Light Artillery, Battery M, Capt. Augustus H. Emery.
1st Tennessee Light Artillery, Battery B, Capt. William O. Beebe.

O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLIX/1 [S# 103] MARCH 21-APRIL 25, 1865.--Expedition from E. Tn. into SW Va. and W. NC No. 2.--Organization of Troops in the District of East Tennessee, commanded by Maj. Gen. George Stoneman, U.S. Army, March 31, 1865. FOURTH DIVISION (DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND).

Brig. Gen. DAVIS TILLSON.
First Brigade.
Col. CHAUNCEY G. HAWLEY.
2d North Carolina Mounted Infantry (seven companies), Maj. Andrew J. Barney.
3d North Carolina Mounted Infantry, Col. George W. Kirk.
4th 'Tennessee (eight companies), Maj. Thomas H. Reeves.
1st Ohio Heavy Artillery, Maj. Timothy S. Matthews.
1st U.S. Colored Heavy Artillery, Col. John A. Shannon.
Indiana Light Artillery, Wilder Battery, Capt. Huber T. Thomas.

O.R.--SERIES I--VOLUME XLIX/2 [S# 104]
Union Correspondence, Orders, And Returns Relating To Operations In Kentucky, Southwestern Virginia, Tennessee, Northern And Central Georgia, Mississippi, Alabama, And West Florida, From March 16 To June 30, 1865.--#22
DISTRICT OF EAST TENNESSEE.
Maj. Gen. GEORGE STONEMAN.
FOURTH DIVISION, DEPARTMENT OF THE CUMBERLAND.

Brig. Gen. DAVIS TILLSON.
First Brigade.
Col. CHAUNCEY G. HAWLEY.
2d North Carolina Mounted Infantry, Lieut. Col. William C. Bartlett.
3d North Carolina Mounted Infantry, Col. George W. Kirk.
4th Tennessee, Maj. Thomas H. Reeves.
10th Tennessee, Col. James W. Scully.
Indiana Light Artillery, Wilder Battery, Capt. Hubbard T. Thomas.
1st Ohio Heavy Artillery, Lieut. Col. Fordyce M. Keith.
1st U.S. Colored Heavy Artillery, Lieut. Col. John E. McGowan.